Gospel Centered Worship

Archive of: Practical

  • 10 Tips for Leading Worship in a Church Plant (Part 2)

    10 Tips for Leading Worship in a Church Plant (Part 2)

    Last week was Part 1 of 10 Tips for Leading Worship in a Church Plant. If you haven’t already, make sure to go back and read that post first before you go any further. As I said in my previous post, leading worship in a church plant setting is unique in that you have the opportunity to develop a ministry from scratch. In many ways, you are laying a foundation that will impact your church for years to come – so it’s crucial that you start well. While there are lots of resources aimed at worship leaders in established churches, I have found a lack of materials for equipping worship leaders in church plant contexts – hence the reason for these posts. So, without further adieu, here is Part 2.

  • 10 Tips for Leading Worship in a Church Plant (Part 1)

    10 Tips for Leading Worship in a Church Plant (Part 1)

    Five years ago I moved to Bend, Oregon, to help lead worship for a young church plant. At the time, I didn’t fully understand what I was getting myself into, but I was convinced that God had led me there for a purpose. Five years later, I can say that leading worship in a church plant is both good work and hard work. It is humbling and flat out exhausting at times, but also joyous and life giving. Most of all, it’s a privilege to have a front row seat watching God build his church.

  • 6 Questions to Ask When Introducing a New Song

    6 Questions to Ask When Introducing a New Song

    I recently wrote about how to better serve our congregations​ by introducing fewer but more intentional new songs. In order to implement this intentionality, we need to first be asking the right questions when we do go searching for new songs. While this is not an exhaustive list, here are six important questions to ask of new worship songs.

  • Why You Should Introduce Fewer New Songs This Year

    Why You Should Introduce Fewer New Songs This Year

    While it is tempting to try and keep up with the overwhelming amount of new songs available to us today, we will actually serve our congregations better if we purposefully limit ourselves to fewer but more intentional new songs.